The purpose of the African Women in Cinema Blog is to provide a space to discuss diverse topics relating to African women in cinema--filmmakers, actors, producers, and all film professionals. The blog is a public forum of the Centre for the Study and Research of African Women in Cinema.

Le Blog sur les femmes africaines dans le cinéma est un espace pour l'échange d'informations concernant les réalisatrices, comédiennes, productrices, critiques et toutes professionnelles dans ce domaine. Ceci sert de forum public du Centre pour l'étude et la recherche des femmes africaines dans le cinémas.

ABOUT THE BLOGGER

My photo
Director/Directrice, Centre for the Study and Research of African Women in Cinema | Centre pour l'étude et la recherche des femmes africaines dans le cinéma

17 October 2019

Ugandan Eleanor Nabwiso, laureate of the African Focus Award for her film "Bed of Thorns", a film raising consciousness about gender-based violence against women

Ugandan Eleanor Nabwiso, laureate of the African Focus Award at the 2019 London ArtHouse Film Festival for her film "Bed of Thorns", a film raising consciousness about gender-based violence against women.

The film, produced and directed by Eleanor Nabwiso was made with an all-women crew.

"I want to put out more films about gender based violence in detail… The cultural norms in Africa believe that men should beat their wives, to show that they love them, or that a woman is beaten because she is guilty of something… A man beating his wife is wrong, not just in Africa but across the world. The message from this film is: 'don't keep quiet'... We call it 'bedroom matters', if you are fighting with your husband keep it in your bedroom…and when you come out of the bedroom, smile to the world, this is wrong, speak out, tell someone about it. (From BBC interview: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07qzj3s)

Synopsis:

Bed of Thorns follows the story of Stella who is getting married in a few weeks but friends around her know she is being battered by her fiancé and their aim is to stop the wedding from happening. All of her friends are actually undergoing domestic violence from emotional abuse, physical abuse, bullying, and rape.


Links:


16 October 2019

Appel à films | Call for entries 2020 : Mis Me Binga Festival International de Films de Femmes | International Women’s Film Festival (Cameroun | Cameroon)

Appel à films | Call for entries 2020
Mis Me Binga Festival International de Films de Femmes | International Women’s Film Festival
(Cameroun | Cameroon)

Mis Me Binga Festival International de Films de Femmes

23-27 Juin | June 2020

Les femmes cinéastes du monde nous devoilent
LE MONDE VU PAR ELLES

Women filmmakers of the world unveil the 2020 edition:
THE WORLD SEEN THROUGH WOMEN'S EYES

Longs-métrages et courts-métrages | Feature and short films

Inscriptions en ligne à | Online applications at : mismebinga@gmail.com

Envoyez des films avant le | Send films before : 28 février | February 2020

14 October 2019

In Memory of Namibian filmmaker Oshosheni Hiveluah

In Memory of Namibian filmmaker Oshosheni Hiveluah

I have the sad news of the passing of Oshosheni Hiveluah on 09 October 2019. Let us give tribute to her, her work and her contribution to cinema. She will be dearly missed.

I am republishing excerpts of the interview with her on the African Women in Cinema Blog and her report of the 2014 International Images International Film Festival for Women (IIFF), also on the Blog.

Well in terms of growing up, I was born in exile in Angola. Since I was born during the war my perception was for a very long time very militant because of propaganda songs, videos and the lifestyle that I lived. Then I spent part of my childhood in the former GDR and my first cinema experience was so magical and enchanting-I think it was the 1984 film, Neverending Story and I was fascinated with cinemas from that day forth. This was the total opposite of what moving images had been for me before this, so as any child would have, I fell in love and hard. We didn't go to the cinema often but when we did I could not hide my enthusiasm for days ahead. Most of the regular weekly stuff I was exposed to were the TV shows like Batman etc. you know 80's shows-sitcoms, Cosby show, etc., but because we lived in a communist state the shows that were screened had to be in line with communistic ideals and of course all channels were majorly censored. Back in Namibia from 1990 I was exposed to a lot of commercial blockbuster Hollywood films and very few African films which made filmmaking in my eyes appear to be an exclusive and distant thing and for a selective few. Because I always wanted to tell stories however I opted for theatre at the time, because it was open to me to explore. Then I remember seeingSarraounia (Med Hondo, 1986) one evening as a teenager, a film shot in Burkina Faso, and it changed my outlook and perception on African cinema. I then started digging and searching for more foreign films, going to embassies for film screenings and trying to expose myself to films I was not accessing and films that had that heart, that passion that I shared when telling stories. Then I moved to Cape Town to study and I felt like I had arrived, there were alternative theaters (cinema nouveau and Labia) that screened independent films and it was during that time that I was also learning more about filmmaking, work on set, etc.

09 October 2019

Call for Applications Open: Cinematography Workshop for Women from the Horn of Africa (Hargeysa, Somalia) - Deadline 10 November 2019

Call for Applications Open: Cinematography Workshop for Women from the Horn of Africa (Hargeysa, Somalia) - Deadline 10 November 2019  - The Carrot Co.

PRESS RELEASE: APPLICATION CALL (OPEN)
Send application to: workshop@thecarrotco.org

The major part of storytelling is image composition. The framing, the lights, shades, moods, shapes and camera movement. And that’s why it’s called moving pictures.
As we continuously advocate for the creation of more African stories, we must deliberately include the participation of women in capturing them. In an attempt, we have now open an application call for women/girls who want to learn the art of image composition. To be a camera woman.

By the end of this workshop you will be able to demonstrate technical control over the basic elements of photography, including exposure, lighting and framing. You’ll develop an understanding in capturing moments and the collaboration between the cinematographer and the director. During and after the workshop you will be able to succesfully complete a variety of film projects and managing each project during the pre-production, production and post-production phases.

To apply, please fill in the form here https://forms.gle/cFsR5q9HhHxDxWr98

Application closes on the 10th of November, 2019.

The Art of Visual Storytelling Workshop for Women

Introduction to Camera/Camera Parts
-lightening and exposure
-white balance
-types of shots
-composition techniques
-camera angles
-camera movements

Introduction to Visual Storytelling
-documentary storytelling
-three-act structure
-developing unique stories

Pre-production
-planning
-location scouting
-assembling equipment

Production
-filming
-previewing rushes

Post production
-assembly for editing
-editing previewing director cut
-working on the final cut


The CARROT Co is an experiential art based organization formed to confront challenges facing the development sector using new media and tools to communicate to a targeted audience. 

The CARROT Co. is a collective of award winning African artists with IT experts, legal practitioners, community mobilisers, high level project managers and pan African activists working in the development sector to transform communication using the ART.

Our aim is to creatively simplify messaging, dignify African lives, and amplify social causes for an impactful and sustainable development. We have all worked, lived and experience several African countries with strength in multiple languages and cultural integration.

Source: Twitter and Facebook